There’s good and bad news for BMW Motorrad fans who have long been clamouring for the German brand to enter the entry-level segment of the motorcycle market. The good news is the company has decided to do so, with its new G 310 R motorcycle. And the bad news is, depending on the country, your bike license may require an upgrade to ride the bike legally.

The BMW Motorrad G 310 R features a new water-cooled 313cc single-cylinder engine with DOHC, which requires an A1 license for those residing in European Union countries, and either a B1 or Full B for Malaysians. BMW Motorrad actually featured the G 310 R about a month as a stunt concept bike during the Brazilian Motorcycle Show.

At a glance, the G 310 R looks like a cross between Honda’s CB300F and Kawasaki’s Z250SL, and it is the BMW badge on both sides of the tank provides clue that it is not a product of either Japanese company.

Just like the stunt bike concept, the street G 310 R engine’s lone cylinder is tilted to the rear and the cylinder head has been rotated by 180-degrees, a move BMW says helps lower the bike’s center of gravity. Thanks to the reverse cylinder configuration, the intake is forward-mounted. The G 310 R engine puts out a claimed 34hp in a machine that tips the scales just under 350 pounds.

The 2016 G 310 R is built around a bolted steel frame and tubular steel subframe. The engine serves as a load-bearing member. While its aluminum swingarm looks a bit long, the wheelbase on the G 310 R is quite compact at 150cm. A monoshock with preload adjustability sorts out the ride on the rear while a 41mm upside-down fork anchors the front.

Like all BMW motorcycles, the ABS comes standard. The braking package sees an ample-sized 300mm disc on the front mated to a 4-piston radial caliper to go along with a 240mm rotor on the back with a single-piston floating caliper. The G 310 R rolls on 17-inch cast aluminum wheels front and back, a slim 110mm tyre on the front end while the rear uses a 150mm size.

The G 310 R has a sporty aesthetic, a small angular fairing shrouding the solo headlamp. The lines of the tank and tail are sharp and aggressive. The rider’s triangle appears fairly compact with riders positioned at a slightly forward lean. The G 310 R will be available with three seat adjustments that range from 815 to 760mm, the standard seat height set at 785mm.

The 2016 BMW G 310 R has been designed in a collaborative effort with the TVS Indian factory who knows a thing or two about building small displacement motorcycles. The front suspension is done by upside down forks, and a linearly mounted rear shock, the latter having an adjustable preload. ABS is of course standard.

All-in-all, the BMW G310R should be ideal for female riders, as can be certain from the photos published here, with the company pitching the BMW G310R as an approachable variant for women to enter motorcycling on. The G310R is more important than just get female riders into the BMW brand, it’s about getting all riders on a BMW motorcycle.

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Edited: Philip Chong